Paterson

NBC News Report: Potential Voter Fraud Roils Paterson

He’s back, the man who bagged former Mayor Jose “Joey” Torres.

According to Jonathan Dienst of NBC News:

“Hundreds of vote-by-mail ballots in Paterson may have been improperly bundled – with those votes possibly being improper or illegal, election and postal officials said Monday.

“Postal authorities have informed the Passaic County Board of Elections about the potential violations involving vote-by-mail ballots – ballots they discovered by the hundreds in some mailboxes. Those votes will be reviewed by election officials on Tuesday to decide if they are legitimate or fraudulent.”

To read the full story, please go here.

NJDOE Commish Repollet To Become Kean U. Prez

Lamont Repollet, Ed.D., the New Jersey Commissioner of Education and a Kean alumnus, will become the 18th leader of Kean University. The Board of Trustees announced the appointment on Monday, May 11, following a unanimous vote in support of the thoughtful and charismatic educator.

Governor Murphy said: ‘I wish Lamont and his family nothing but the best in his next endeavor, and know Kean University is in good hands with him at the helm.’

Mendez and McKoy.

In Paterson’s 3rd Ward, McKoy Makes Case for ‘Major Scrub’ to VBM Process

Incumbent Third Ward Councilman Bill McKoy expressed confidence Monday night in the face of a May

McKoy
McKoy

12th election deadline for voters exercising their franchise in an historic all-vote-by-mail (VBM) election.

He believes he will win over challenger, former At-Large Councilman Alex Mendez.

But he had less overall confidence in the VBM-process, and as Governor Phil Murphy mulls how to handle the coming July 7th Primary elections in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, with a posible announcement by week’s end, McKoy had a few on-the-ground thoughts.

“They would have to do a major scrub and change it drastically to make it work,” the councilman told InsiderNJ.

He acknowledged a “ton of irregularities,”  including what he called a mixed bag on voter registration lists, which include dead people – one of whom McKoy said died 15 years ago. In addition, he said, a lot  of people have not received their ballots.

“There are a lot of extra votes floating in the community, which raises the level of concern,” McKoy said. “The Board of Elections will have to review the process they’re using. As for the Post Office, I understand they are under pressure, but they will have to step up their game.”

Would he advocate an all-VBM primary based on what he experienced in his own ward contest?

“I think the whole idea of affording everyone the opportunity to vote while in this pandemic is a laudable goal,” said McKoy.

To this point, turnout in the 3rd is lightly above where it was in 2016, but not significantly, which is partly why the councilman expressed confidence. “People are still not exercising their franchise though it’s relatively convenient to vote this time.  I do think they can simplify it for people. Clearly, current health concerns are sufficienct to warrant the notion that we need to do this [have an election] with social distancing; though I think that can be accomplished with spacing at the polls.”

Considering the immediacy of his own election, the councilman said again that he believes the numbers favor him over Mendez.

“We should have a good outcome,” he said. “I think in many cases Mendez is a known quantity and more of a confidence guy. The reaction seems to be, ‘You’re not able to sell me that product anymore. We’ve bought the used car.’ He had no message this time around, just catch-phrases on a piece of paper to malign my character. Not very successful.”

Atlantic City: Referendum Opponents Confident of Victory

Craig Callaway, the lead operative working against the referendum, acknowledged that the “yes” forces will receive their biggest boosts of support in wards one and six – two of the highest performing wards to this point of the rolling VBM (vote-by-mail) election with a deadline tomorrow. But the Democratic Party minder said he doesn’t even think his rivals will win Ward Six; in fact he sees them getting buried there.

The backers of the “no” vote on Tuesday’s referendum question in Atlantic City this afternoon expressed considerable confidence in the face of an effort to change the city’s form of government.

“I feel great,” Mayor Marty Small told InsiderNJ. “This is money power versus people power. The cast of characters on the other side had no real human connection to the city. Once people found out what this was about, they rejected it. We believe we’re going to be victorious whole, and there will be a lot of people with egg on their faces now.

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